Late Post

Sonic The Hedgehog Movie Sequel Has Been Confirmed

When Paramount first released the trailer for the Sonic the Hedgehog movie, it was met with immediate backlash over the design of the character. This was because the character looked nothing like what fans of the video game franchise knew and loved, which led to the movie being delayed while they reworked the design.

It turned out that it might have been a good idea as the movie went on to do pretty well for itself as far as video game movies were concerned, so much so that it looks like a sequel to the movie has since been officially confirmed. The movie will also be bringing back the team where Jeff Fowler will be directing, while Pat Casey and Josh Miller will be writing the script.

The movie is said to be in the early stages of development, so there is still no word on casting or

In Minneapolis, Neighbors Are Mobilizing—Offline

Worried about infiltration from extremist groups or police surveillance, residents are turning to pre-internet tactics to help protect homes and local stores.…

This Malaysian university wants to use robots for their graduation ceremonies

The coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, has put a halt on many important events across the globe. This ranges from major sporting events like Formula One, to film and music festivals like South by Southwest (SXSW).

But perhaps nothing stings more than the unlikelihood of a proper graduation ceremony for the Class of 2020.

After spending years in university, we all look forward to stepping up on that stage and collecting our well-deserved scrolls. Unfortunately, the coronavirus doesn’t care about what you want.

But one university in Malaysia is proposing the use of robots as real-life student avatars in a pandemic-stricken world.

Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA) is a public university located in the state of Terengganu, along the North-East coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

Like many educational institutions across the country, UniSZA has been forced to cancel all convocation ceremonies in order to abide by the government-imposed Conditional Movement Control

What Facebook doesn’t understand about the Facebook walkout

I. The CEO

On Friday afternoon, Facebook made one of its most controversial content moderation decisions in company history. After President Trump posted to Facebook some tweets that Twitter had placed behind a warning for “glorifying violence,” Mark Zuckerberg said that the company would allow them to stand.

“I know many people are upset that we’ve left the President’s posts up,” Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post, “but our position is that we should enable as much expression as possible unless it will cause imminent risk of specific harms or dangers spelled out in clear policies.”

“When the looting starts, the shooting starts,” Trump had tweeted — quoting a former Miami police chief who, in 1967, called for a violent crackdown on the city’s black community. And just as the president suggested, a long weekend of violence followed in the United States, with police assaulting protesters and bystanders