Wearing face mask can cause ‘maskne’. Here’s how to prevent them from happening.

With the new normal comes a new set of challenges.

The World Health Organization (WHO), healthcare providers, and renowned scientists around the globe have been urging many to wear face masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

While having the piece of protective equipment around your nose and mouth along with social distancing measures certainly helps in flattening the curve, having a face mask on has been causing skin problems for many.

Introducing, “maskne”.

The struggle is real. IMAGE: Dr. Axe.

Those who’ve been often out and about with their face masks on have begun spotting acne, rashes, and have even experienced itchiness around their face, specially in the region of their nose, cheeks, and mouth.

It’s called “maskne” and it’s not as serious as you think it is. Though, yes, it can get you uncomfortable and at times, it can be painful.

The reason that is causing them to develop is the combination of moisture from our breath, a spike in carbon dioxide around the skin along with heat that is causing a breakout of acne.

Some people also have allergies to face masks due to the preservatives in them.

“Like formaldehyde and so forth, so there can be allergies from those kinds of industrial processes that make the masks,” Dr. Ramsay Farah, Dermatologist at Farah Dermatology and Cosmetics says.

Okay, so how do you prevent “maskne” from happening?

IMAGE: Tokyo Weekender.

To ensure you don’t suffer from acne or any skin problems, do the following:

  1. Avoid picking at those pimples.
  2. Ensure you clean your cloth masks and throw away the one’s that you’ve used the most.
  3. Use moisturizing creams to protect yourself from inflammation.
  4. Exfoliate often and take prescription medicine. But consult your doctor first!

If problems still persist, it’s best to consult a dermatologist.

All said, don’t let “maskne” be the reason to stop wearing face masks.

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Cover image sourced from Cleveland Clinic.